Italian Charoset

Italian Charoset

Italian Charoset

Charoset is one of the symbolic foods that we eat during our Passover seder: its name comes from the Hebrew word cheres (חרס), which means “clay.” Charoset is a dense fruit paste that represents the mortar used by the ancient Hebrew slaves in Egypt to make bricks. Because Passover celebrates freedom, a small amount of charoset is placed on the seder plate as a reminder that we were once slaves and we should not take our freedom for granted.

There are many different versions of Charoset in Italy. Let’s start with the one I usually make for my Seder, a recipe from Padova (Padua), near Venice:

Italian Charoset

Ingredients

  • 1 pound apple slices, peeled
  • 3/4 pound boiled chestnuts, peeled
  • 1/2 pound walnuts, shelled
  • 1/2 pound pitted dates
  • 1/2 pound dried apricots
  • 1/2 pound raisins
  • 2 small bananas
  • 1 small seedless orange, only the zulp
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon cloves (if liked)
  • Charoset from Livorno (Leighorn), courtesy of my friend Lea,
  • (who also taught me how to make Tuscan Cous-Cous):
  • 2 or 3 apples, depending on the size (peeled, cored and chopped)
  • 1 pear (peeled, cored and chopped)
  • 4 dates, chopped
  • 2 dried figs, chopped
  • 4 dried prunes, chopped
  • 2/3 cup blanched almonds, whole or split in two
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts (or blanched hazelnuts)
  • 1/4 cup pistachios (or walnuts)
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 4 cloves (if liked)
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoons cinnamon, or to taste
  • Charoset from Acqui Piemonte – very easy, it doesn’t require cooking!
  • 2/3 cup blanched almonds
  • 6 pitted dates
  • 1 matzah
  • 1/2 a cup or more Marsala or sweet wine, or grape juice for a non-alcoholic version
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • cinnamon powder to taste

Directions

Padova (Padua):

Put everything in the blender and process until combined, but it shouldn’t be too smooth..

Cook on a low flame for 15 minutes, stirring. Add some sweet wine or grape juice right before serving.

Charoset from Livorno (Leighorn):

Combine all ingredients except for the sugar and spices in a heavy or non-stick saucepan, add about 1/2 cup water and cook on low heat for about 15 minutes. Add the sugar and spices, and cook for 5 more minutes. Serve cold or at room temperature.

Charoset from Acqui Piemonte:

Coarsely grind the almonds, the dates, and the matzah. Combine with the sugar and add the wine or grape juice, adding the liquid slowly until the desired texture is desired. Place in a serving bowl and sprinkle with cinnamon.

http://dinnerinvenice.com/2011/04/10/italian-charoset/